About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
CNNW 11
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
CSPAN2 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
from spain. this is based on documents provided by edward snowden. >> arriving for an uncomfortable meeting, the u.s. ambassador in major it has questions to answer after a spanish newspaper published elite documents showing u.s. intelligence services tracked more than 60 million phone calls made in spain between december and january of this year. a massive 3.5 million calls in one day. they say the monitoring appears to track where the calls were made and how long they lasted, but not their content. the spanish government has demanded full details about what information was collected from their citizens. >> as always, we learn about what is going on after it has happened. that is how it is with american intelligence. they are always ahead of us. >> it is a disgrace they are spying on governments and ministers. we will see what happens, but to me, this is a very serious violation. >> it comes after the prime rejected calls for an eu wide no-spying agreement. they wanted more information before supporting the special arrangement with the united states. he white house has denied that
tapper when he interviewed him earlier this week. tapper asked him about edward snowden. i want to play what he said. >> the problem with snowden is he had access to classified information. he violated conditions under which they got those. he's a traitor, pure and simple. and i don't think you can judge him any other way. there's some people who say he's a whistle-blower. he's talked about methods and ways we collect intelligence. >> a number of people said and come around and changed their opinion but clearly vice president cheney has not, doesn't sound like he's going to. how do you respond to what he said? >> i'm really glad dick cheney is available to speak on this because i think he under scores the most important point. dick cheney engaged in some of the worst, most radical conduct in the last century in the united states and did it all in secret from lying about the war in iraq, to torturing people, to putting people in cages with no lawyers. to eavesdropping of the american people without the warrants required by law. people in political power like dick cheney want to do what t
administration is trying to sal silence doubts about the rollout and edward snowden's latest bombshell. they listened in on friendly global leaders and american's top spy said there is nothing new. i'll talk to glenn greenwald, what he says. >>> catch a wave and you're sitting on top of the world and catch this wave and you may land in the record books. i'll talk to a surfer on what it is like to hang ten on a 100-foot ocean wave, only here. >>> we begin with big new developments in the obama care story. this is different from the political war fair you see night after night on the partisan news channels because health care reform is so i'm fortunate we're doing what we can to turn down the noise and turn up the facts. item one, a document that clearly shows when the white house got the warning the healthcare.gov website was a disaster in the making. >> reporter: cnn learned at the obama administration was warned in september the obama care website wasn't ready to go live. the main contractor, cgi issued this confidential report to the agency overseeing the healthcare.gov rollout. it w
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
these stories when they come out, what does this new revelation from edward snowden from nsa reveal what the agency has been up to. >> the way that you just introduced that is crucial, right? because virtually every one of these stories, the day that it comes out, everybody pulls out their hair, runs around, i can't believe this is happening. this is crazy and then quietly over the next couple days we get revisions to the story. sometimes we get wholesale rewrites of the story and they don't appear to be anything like what they whrp they were first broken. we did that with the story we discussed here on the panel one night when it came out "the washington post" broke the story originally and then it had to be basically rewritten a couple days later. we have seen the same thing with the stories about the united states vacuuming up virtually every phone call across europe turns out that wasn't true. partners in europe were involved in that turns out they probably about most of the vacuuming for us. i'm reluctant to offer any kind of definitive take on what this means until we know that it
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
with the former vice president dick cheney. cheney says edward snowden is "a traitor." plain and simple. my asthma's under control. i don't miss out... you sat out most of our game yesterday! asthma doesn't affect my job... you were out sick last week. my asthma doesn't bother my family... you coughed all through our date night! i hardly use my rescue inhaler at all. what did you say? how about - every day? coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at asthma.com, then talk to your doctor. there may be more you could do for your asthma. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. ♪ [ male announcer ] eeny, meeny, miny, go. ♪ ♪ more adventures await in the new seven-passenger lexus gx. lease the 2014 gx 460 for $499 a month for 27 months. see your lexus dealer. for $499 a month for 27 months. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. on
snowden' snowden's snowdd edward cameron's are are answer was this. >> i don't want to use the tougher measures. i think it's better to appeal to the social responsibility, it will be difficult for government to stand back and not to act. >> ing earlier in the houses of parliament. comments being made in spain as well today. >> the ramifications of the leaks, the nsa and the gchq are annoying governments all around the world. spain is the latest. its foreign minister has said revelations will suffer and actions will be taken on their behalf so they're clearly not happy about what's going on. >> you've had a busy day, talk about it i guess you could call it a spying scandal in the u.k, concerns media, newspapers and a hacking trial. i know you were in court earlier for that. >> yes, this has been going on for years as far as i can remember. this is a scandal which involves british newspapers and what they would do over a period of a decade, and two figures that are quite well-known in british public life, re rebecca brooks,d andy corson former editor of news of the world. they and six o
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
a literal run in with a camera. >> usa today, edward snowden has a new job working for a russian website. it starts earlier this month. they didn't name the company for security reasons. "the washington post," employees of the department of homeland security may have boosted their pay with overtime they didn't earn. with o.t., it's $8.7 million a year. this tactic could add money to a paycheck and used to recruit new workers. >>> san diego union tribune, a police officer issued what many believe is the first ticket for driving while wearing google glass. oh, my god. this woman was caught after being caught for speeding. she plans to fight the ticket. it was blocking her vision and causing a distraction. >>> from "the washington post," the moment air travelers have been waiting for. as long as they don't allow talking on phones. >> what? >> the faa finally agreed to let passengers use electronic devices like tablets and phones throughout flights. >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: on this halloween travel day with costumes on full display at the airport, there was a treat awaiting travelers. >>
the firm whose background checks helped nsa leaker edward snowden and aaron alexis get clearances. they are accused of failing to perform quality control reviews in its investigations of potential government workers. >>> check out the white house. it's getting beautified or boo-tified for halloween. lit up in orange and purple lights. decorated with jack-o'-lanterns and cobwebs. imagine if the white house is in your neighborhood. what are we going to get? >> a long security line. >> that's true. >>> coming up on "new day," we heard the apologies from kathleen sebelius, the vice president. why? obvious, the obama care website. they're pledging to get it fixed. the question, is that enough. >>> and the startling new accusation against the nsa. the agency says it was not peering into yahoo! and google databases. what it is not denying is raising more questions. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses
-mails and facebook posts at the end of the show. >>> meantime, the hits from fugitive leaker edward snowden keep oncoming, leaving the white house in damage control. the obama administration sending off reports now that president obama knew that the nsa was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel's personal phone calls. this as we hear of another bombshell. the nsa reportedly monitored 60 million phone calls made in spain in just a single month. here's jay carney just a few moments ago talking about that scandal. >> was the president kept out of the loop about what the nsa was doing? >> josh, what i can tell you is two things.ibz first, i'm not going to get into details of internal discussions. but the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can, we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. today's world is highly interconnected. and the flow of large amounts of data is unprecedented. innovation is going to continue. if we're going to keep our citizens and our allies safe, we have to continue to stay ah
classified information from ex-nsa employee edward snowden. added if they don't stop doing so "it will be very difficult for government to stand back and not to act." bret. >> james, thank you. >>> answers are still hard to come by in the investigation into last fall's benghazi terror assault. last night one of journalisms heavy hitter confirms what we knew and had reported on. correspondent add day housely has the latest from los angeles. >> reporter: it's been more than a year since the attacks on benghazi and still information provided by the state department, military, cia and the white house has been incomplete, contradictory and fails to answer many questions. >> a lot of responsibility, a lot of ownous that needs to be taken up and accounted for. >> reporter: but accounts have been tough to come by. as witnesses claim they've been threatened and in some cases forced to sign nondisclosure agreements. fox spoke last may with an american special operator who witnessed the attack. >> i don't blame -- you know, it's something that's a risky especially in our profession to say an
calls. >> i don't know i'd want to know. >> edward snowden, former government contractor who is wanted for leaking classified nsa documents. >> got to make a living. russia's official news agency reporting that snowden starts tomorrow doing computer maintenance. guess what? for one of russia's largest websites. they didn't say which website. russia gave asylum to snowden in august. >> also following syria, it can no longer produce chemical weapons. that at least according to international group that is overseeing the effort to eliminate the country's chemical weapons arsenal. >> the next step for syria to destroy its existing weapons and stockpiles. what it's done now, these inspectors, the raw materials if you like. >> reporter: i'm fred pleitgen in germany. the organization tasked with monitoring the destruction of the program says that syria has destroyed all of its production, mixing, filling capabilities. the organization visited 21 of 23 sites, 2 sites too dangerous to visit because of the ongoing civil war situation in syria. the next big task is troying all of the chemical weap
's been talked about edward snowden getting clemency. he has asked for that. should he get clemency? >> no. he's not getting clemency. the fact he broke the law, he stole classified material. what i ask the question is, who has been fired at the nsa for being so sloppy, so negligent to allow a 29-year-old to allow a 29-year-old to walk away with highly classified material? nobody has to my knowledge. >> important question. senator leahy, thank you so much for your time this afternoon. we appreciate it. >>> coming up, big news at the supreme court. nbc news justice correspondent pete williams joins me next. stay with us. you're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never made with hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that h
by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. host: kevin on twitter asks -- guest: you're caller earlier talked about the boston bo
discovered. we'll tell you where. >>> more apparent leaks from edward snowden. how the nsa hacked google and yahoo! jon: right now we're learn about a new sophisticated border tunnel that may have been used to smuggle drugs between the u.s. and mexico. investigators in recent years have found a whole slew of such passageways of the you will probably remember this one uncovered back in 2012. roughly 240 yards long running bee heneath the boredder in arizona. we're told the new discovery runs from san diego to tijuana. the feds have not confirmed what it was used for, when it was built or exactly how well-engineered it is. some tunnels are quite advanced. this one in 2012 as well was 600 yards long equipped with electric railcars, lights and even ventilation. jenna: well another story in the nsa spying saga. new reports that the feds secretly hacked google and yahoo! breaking into their highly secure data centers and stealing essentially, confidential information from hundred of millions of user accounts. this according to new documents from leaker edward snowden and they have been reporte
. of course putin is more powerful than obama. martha: you know, we learned edward snowden was given a tech job in russia. he was clearly protected by the russian government when we asked in no uncertain terms he please be sent back because of the nsa infractions. that was basically thrown back in our face. you look at the relationship has deteriorated to some extent with israel. you look at our relationship with saudi arabia which is not in any way what it once was on the world stage. and it raises a lot of these questions and, dick cheney, i know it is not going to come as a surprise to anybody he feels this way, but he spoke out about this earlier this week and i want to play that for you. >> if we had a presence over there, if we had been able to continue the policies that we put in place, if we had been able to work to keep governments, establish government that is are stable, willing to defend their own sovereign turf we would be much better off. now we're in a position where our adversaries no longer fear us and our allies no longer trust us. martha: jemu, what do you think about tha
, a bombshell out of germany, edward snowden, america's most wanted document leaker, wants to testify before congress, the american congress. snowden, whose nsa leaks are still rattling cages met with a german lawmaker in moscow. fred pleitgen is in germany with more. >> reporter: hi, carol. i have the letter, it's interesting because it doesn't mention germany by name. the operative part of this letter says "i hope when the difficulties of this humanitarian situation" meaning the limbo he's in, in russia "have been resolved and i will be able to cooperate in the responsible finding of fact regarding the reports in the media" that of course pertains to the documents behind a lot of the media reports regarding the nsa for instance spying on the german chancellor but a lot of other things disclosed recently and from that and from his talks with edward snoweden this german lawmakers discerns that snowden would be able to travel to germany to testify in front of german parliament about the leaks coming out or perhaps stay in russia and have members of german parliament come there. there are a lo
calls and showed them how the report got it wrong. showed then the slide that edward snowden had released and said this is not true. and by and large talking to the members, they found the explanation satisfying. alexander also told them that when the nsa collects data in europe, they do it in collaboration with european intelligence agency. so i said is it hypocritical for you to be krit sicriticizing th when you're participating. >> we want to get to the truth. there are a set of allegations -- >> by americans and europeans? >> whoever it was, whatever partnerships it may have been, whoever it was, we want to get to the truth of it. >> so in effect they're angry at both sides. they're demanding answers from the u.s. and european governments to find out why mass surveillance is happening and to what extent. >> you're getting statements from yahoo! and google, right? >> that's right. this is in response to the "washington post" story about accessing communications links between their servers. this is from google, we have long been concerned about the possibility of this kind of s
and help him. back to you, kate. >> thank you so much. >>> in russia, nsa leaker edward snowden is starting a new job. diana magnay has details from moscow. >> edward snowden starts a new job, tech support his lawyer says for a major russian website. we don't know which one but there's one that seems most likely, the russian version of facebook. it made snowden a very public job offer a few weeks back. it's the only major site who hasn't denied hiring him and it's recently launched a highly encrypted messaging system to protect user privacy. it sounds like a good fit but this is still guesswork. kate. >> thank you. in china, if you've ever had trouble opening a got of beer, you'll feel for these guys, trying to do it with a helicopter. monita rajpal explains. >> the best helicopter pilots have been showing off amazing skills in the skies. you might think it would be easier to open this beer bottle by hands but these teams at the tournament clearly relevant itch a challenge. pilots had eight minutes to open five beer bottles perched on poles above the ground without breaking them, the idea b
spies here. the problem is you can't get caught. somewhere in russia edward snowden is smiling right now, coming up in congressional testimony like we've heard. so this has really thrown off the -- thrown the white house off balance. at first, the president was saying the nsa is not spying on americans. now they've have to deal with spying on foreign leaders. that's been the big problem. >> okay. bob cusack, thank you very much. coming up next, the cnn film "blackfish" has sparked a nationwide debate over what should be done with killer whales in captivity. there's been a huge push to set the whales free. the big question is, once the whales are released back into the ocean, what happens next? we investigate that after the break. it's a growing trend in business: do more with less with less energy. hp is helping ups do just that. soon, the world's most intelligent servers, designed by hp, will give ups over twice the performance, using forty percent less energy. multiply that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. t
were talking about is how remarkable it would be that edward snowden might have known about this and barack obama didn't. then the other thing that strikes me is, you know, obviously i under that these programs are very controversial but the amount of controversy over this program is a little bit higher it seems than when we found out they were collecting bulk data on regular citizens. diane feinstein the chairman of the senate intelligence committee is outraged over this disclosure but fine with the other ones. >> what's worse to express, mike barnacle, that i think it's many world leaders that have this happen to them not just angela merkel and i wonder if that should have come out or if that creates more of a firestorm. but, again, it's not george w. bush sitting there with his head phones on listening to angela merkel's conversations, or president obama, it's very different. mike? >> but, mike, if the president knows, if he's getting this intel and if these reports are right that the white house and the state department signed off on it he knows without sitting there wi
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)